Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork
Fords And The Furious - Artwork

unique & limited edition

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Ford’s staged finish of the 24 hours of Le Mans in 1966 was one of the most controversial and mysterious chapters in the GTs saga. Although they dominated the race with not one but three of their GT40s leading with 16 laps ahead of the closest competitor, the final outcome was convoluted. Ken Miles and Denis Hulme in their blue #1 GT40 were leading the race until they received the order to slow down and let the other two GT40s catch up for a staged photo finish with all three crossing the finish line only car lengths apart. Miles was announced winner and about to approach the podium when the officials corrected their statement and confirmed, he was only second. The black #2 GT driven by Bruce McLaren and Chris Amon actually won as they had covered the most distance within the 24 hours, after being placed 40 yards behind Miles at the start. Despite Ford winning the race regardless, it was a slight loss for the Americans as they could have achieved a triple triumph with Miles, as his blue GT had previously won Daytona and Sebring – something even Ferrari never managed to do. Rumor has it, it was the Italian rivals who actually pointed out the mistake in the first place.  

Initially the GT40 was not only built for racing purposes but also as an act of revenge targeting Enzo Ferrari. In 1963, Henry Ford II intended to combine forces with Ferrari before the Italian sports car manufacturer abruptly ended all negotiations at the last minute. Furious about this decision, Ford decided to get its revenge by beating the long term winner at Le Mans – which they managed to repeat the following three years. 

In the end it didn’t really matter who took the victory amongst the drivers as long as the race was a win for Ford over Ferrari. 

choose your edition

add optional framing

Learn more about our frames

Price

$250.0

5% discount for Automobilist club members or Register

Free shipping to United States for orders above $300.0

Fords And The Furious - Artwork

Framing

Rives Tradition Pale Cream 170g/m carries a subtle, refined, feltmarked finish, available in whites, creams and deep colours.

Unique & Limited

This is one of our signature line of fine art prints, named as such because it’s created with our Unique methods and is strictly Limited to a specific number. Your print will show its unique production number and the total number of examples produced.

Framing

Framing is not included in the price because we’ve designed the print to be of a standard size so you can get them framed anywhere, but if you’d like us to take care of this for you we’ve provided options for several frame designs.

Packaging & Delivery

Our prints and posters are rolled up in a robust protective tube to ensure their safe delivery to you – wherever you are in the world. Additional gift-wrapping options are available at the checkout.

Have any questions?

We are here to help. You can call us, send us an email or simply drop us an instant message in the chat window to the right. We are ready to answer any queries you might have from Monday-Friday 10:00-17:00 CET.


Magazine articles

Go to magazine


behind the scene

How its done

Every image we create is based on a real-life historical event, so to assure accuracy, we put in long hours of research to piece together every little detail.

Once the concept is established, we set to work creating a 3D model using CGI. Studying every piece of reference material available, our artists essentially build a car from scratch, slowly constructing layer upon layer of detail – even down to the correct number of coats of paint.

Watch making of process


just like in the past

Photoshooting

Lancia Stratos is a sports car and rally car made by Italian car manufacturer Lancia. The HF stands for High Fidelity. It was a very successful rally car, winning the World Rally Championship in 1974, 1975 and 1976.

hasselblad

framing the artwork

Finishing touches

Lancia presented the Bertone-designed Lancia Stratos HF prototype at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. The prototype Stratos HF (Chassis 1240) was fluorescent red in.

Feel assured with our seal of approval

Authenticity

Each piece of art comes with a certificate of authentication, indicating that you have purchased an original work. In addition, each has a silver plaque detailing its unique number. And to really guarantee genuineness, all of our images are hand-signed by the man who initiated turning historical moments into works of art – Jan Rambousek.

framing the artwork

Printing

Lancia presented the Bertone-designed Lancia Stratos HF prototype at the 1971 Turin Motor Show. The prototype Stratos HF (Chassis 1240) was fluorescent red in.

Hahnemühle EPSON

unique & limited
Edition

Our Unique & Limited Edition offering represents our finest range of products. Every story we capture within this collection is unique, showcasing a moment in history like never before, and each piece of art is limited – part of an exclusively numbered print run.